Bianca Valle Talks Nutrition, Balance, and the Truth About Celery Juice

A long time role model of mine, and now a friend, Bianca Valle is not only known for her unique approach to style and beauty, but also more recently, her expertise in nutrition. For the former beauty editor at NYLON, freelance content creator, and NYU-grad, pursuing a career in nutrition seemed like an unexpected path. However, when NYLON folded, Bianca decided to dive into her passion for food and enroll herself in school - from which she recently graduated as a certified holistic nutritionist. On a mission to make wellness more accessible, Bianca now has a donation-based hotline (where you can sign up for 20-minute slots to ask her anything diet-related), and recently published her first wellness zine, “A Note on Wellness,” that she sells for under $20.  

I recently sat down with Bianca to talk about everything from finding balance in your everyday routine, to her typical day of eating -- oh, and she gives us the truth about  celery juice. Scroll down to read the full article.

 
BiancaValle
 
 

Q: What sparked your interest in nutrition? What steps have you had to take to break into this field?  

I’ve always been a food girl, so I never got a spark for nutrition, but knew that I should follow my passion - because I was dabbling around after graduation - and I thought, you know what, I love food, so should really work in food and become a nutritionist. I love healthy food and i always love learning about food combining and going to the farmers markets. So, I put myself in school and opened a hotline, and now I want to start writing wellness pamphlets. 

Q: Describe a typical day of eating for you!

In the morning I start with a cup hot water, matcha with coconut oil in it, and a banana. Lunch is sort of a “macro moment” with rice, veggies, beans, olive oil, and some sort of fermented food.

Q: I’m heading to the grocery store soon. What are the top 5 things I should come home with and why? 

Top 5 Things: sweet potatoes, eggs, oats, bananas, and chard - these are all really low inflammatory foods, except for the chard. I love eating everything cooked or steamed - and the oats are very versatile because I make oat milk from them. 

Q: Thoughts on celery juice? 

The celery juice trend is great, cool, amazing - juicing any vegetable is fabulous - but all vegetable juices have the same kind of effect of detoxifying the body. One i wouldn’t say is better than the other. Celery is maybe a little more detoxifying but it’s not going to save you. It’s about a mix and exercise and managing stress, and caffeine and sugar intake - that’s what is going to help you. 

Q: What do you think is an ingredient and/or food that is very under-rated? 

The most under-rated foods are fermented foods -- everyone should eat them.

Q: What do you think are some common misconceptions about nutrition and/or specific foods?  

I think rice - rice is great for you, as long as you eat it like a normal human would eat it. You shouldn’t eat it all day everyday but, I think I have one serving a rice a day  - it can be white, black, red, brown or it can be quinoa. I think people are so scared of rice because their diets are so full of processed things - so of course if you add in rice, it’s just going to be a mess in your tummy. But if you eat clean and whole and natural, rice is going to be so beautiful for you. 

Q: A lot of people have trouble finding the right balance between what they consume and how much they exercise—and tend to go extreme on one or the other. What do you think is the right balance? 

I think the right balance is eating intuitively when it comes to balancing your exercise and food intake. Eat when you're hungry, don't eat when you’re not. As for exercise, my current philosophy is 30 minutes of cardio (at least) 5 times a week with light calisthenics and that keeps me feeling really good. But, nothing needs to be too extreme, as long as you are being consistent.  

Q: Finally, what can someone expect when they call your nutrition hotline and how can we hit it up? 

When somebody calls my hotline, I basically ask them to take the floor and they can ask me any nutrition questions that they have. It’s usually: “What should I be eating?” “How do you feel about supplements?” What should I do about bread and dairy - what about coffee? So, what I tell them my philosophy which I have been cultivating over the last 3-4 years. And it’s just  a dialogue - and I think it’s really nice to have a human - a real speaking human - rather than some form online or a nutritionist that is going to cost you 800 dollars an hour.

Follow Bianca here: @vbiancav
To purchase “A Note On Wellness,” go here.

Have more questions or comments? Drop them below!